Moth one-two punch

Listening to a couple of recent episodes of The Moth in a row while running this week proved a cathartic experience. “Carl Pillitteri: Fog of Disbelief” (3/11/14) aired on the three year anniversary of the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tōhoku and the ensuing Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. Carl’s breaking voice and frequent pauses to collect himself turn what is a pretty miraculous story of personal luck and survival—on paper—into an eloquent expression of the harrowing fear and confusion, and the lingering sorrow and guilt of what it is to be the survivor of an apocalypse. Then, immediately listened to the devastating story of Hector Black, the murder of his daughter Patricia, and his his super-human journey to the forgiveness of her murderer. Originally heard this story on RadioLab, I think. Ow, my heart.

1 month ago 1 ♥
1 month ago 1 ♥
1 month ago 1 ♥
Concept art for Cubli?

Concept art for Cubli?

(Source: samrowedraws, via weskit)

3 months ago 379735 ♥
This new puppy likes to sleep on my feet, and he saves his favorite farts for me. Seriously, he’s a motherfucking fart factory. I swear I can taste it a little.

This new puppy likes to sleep on my feet, and he saves his favorite farts for me. Seriously, he’s a motherfucking fart factory. I swear I can taste it a little.

4 months ago 2 ♥
4 months ago 1 ♥
arcaneimages:

Orson Welles

Awesome Welles

arcaneimages:

Orson Welles

Awesome Welles

(via mattfractionblog)

8 months ago 227 ♥
sexpigeon:

foomandoonian:

sexpigeon:

The problem with this movie, this modern middlebrow classic, is that it never, ever looks anything like a tv show. There are a thousand shots that are supposed to be from one of the many cameras in the Truman Show universe, and those shots look nothing like a television shot does. 

If I were director Peter Weir, I would take some time and look at how tv looks, particularly how television documentaries look. I would cut it out with the zooms and jiggles and have a lot more sloppy pans and indifferent framing. That’s what I would do. 

The great thing about this movie, this accidental ’90s classic, is this super sweet ensemble Truman Burbank is wearing during the scene when he realizes his whole world is awry. What I wouldn’t do for that sweater alone.

The Truman Show (the fictional production) wasn’t just a reality show though, it was a full-blown drama production. It doesn’t have to look like a shitty reality TV show because it isn’t supposed to be The Real World, Jersey Shore or any of that dross. Christof (Ed Harris) was portrayed as a visionary. He was the Steve Jobs of reality TV, with a science-fiction studio at his disposal.

What’s more important — and what sells the movie for me — is how Weir gives the film an authentic feel by setting limitations about where and how the cameras would really have to be hidden so Truman wouldn’t spot them.

Maaaan I see what you’re saying but it still strikes me as a movie director’s idea of what such a  television production would look like. And I know it couldn’t have, like, anticipated the great leap forward in soft-scripted television that began with Laguna Beach (with its warm chiaroscuro, with its fuzzy-grained charms), but…eh. Every in-show shot feels like a half-measure, possible-enough by the movie’s rules, sure, but where there should be flaky sound and untidy crops there are, instead, vignettes and zooms. Just seems like a cheap and unsophisticated to indicate that something is “on television.”I am willing to be wrong.

I saw this movie in Seattle and afterward, on the walk beneath the monorail back to my car, all of the cars driving along the one-way street suddenly stopped, reversed, and started backing up for no apparent reason. Until my friends and I looked up and saw that we’d walked onto a movie set. That was a weird moment that I deeply treasure.

sexpigeon:

foomandoonian:

sexpigeon:

The problem with this movie, this modern middlebrow classic, is that it never, ever looks anything like a tv show. There are a thousand shots that are supposed to be from one of the many cameras in the Truman Show universe, and those shots look nothing like a television shot does.

If I were director Peter Weir, I would take some time and look at how tv looks, particularly how television documentaries look. I would cut it out with the zooms and jiggles and have a lot more sloppy pans and indifferent framing. That’s what I would do.

The great thing about this movie, this accidental ’90s classic, is this super sweet ensemble Truman Burbank is wearing during the scene when he realizes his whole world is awry. What I wouldn’t do for that sweater alone.

The Truman Show (the fictional production) wasn’t just a reality show though, it was a full-blown drama production. It doesn’t have to look like a shitty reality TV show because it isn’t supposed to be The Real World, Jersey Shore or any of that dross. Christof (Ed Harris) was portrayed as a visionary. He was the Steve Jobs of reality TV, with a science-fiction studio at his disposal.

What’s more important — and what sells the movie for me — is how Weir gives the film an authentic feel by setting limitations about where and how the cameras would really have to be hidden so Truman wouldn’t spot them.

Maaaan I see what you’re saying but it still strikes me as a movie director’s idea of what such a television production would look like. And I know it couldn’t have, like, anticipated the great leap forward in soft-scripted television that began with Laguna Beach (with its warm chiaroscuro, with its fuzzy-grained charms), but…eh. Every in-show shot feels like a half-measure, possible-enough by the movie’s rules, sure, but where there should be flaky sound and untidy crops there are, instead, vignettes and zooms. Just seems like a cheap and unsophisticated to indicate that something is “on television.”

I am willing to be wrong.

I saw this movie in Seattle and afterward, on the walk beneath the monorail back to my car, all of the cars driving along the one-way street suddenly stopped, reversed, and started backing up for no apparent reason. Until my friends and I looked up and saw that we’d walked onto a movie set. That was a weird moment that I deeply treasure.

9 months ago 54 ♥
1 2 3 4 5